Author Topic: The Mexican election  (Read 197 times)

Offline Sweetstar78

The Mexican election
« on: October 12, 2018, 04:55:51 PM »
Got it! I'm not a political person but here goes nothing!!

In the year 2006, Mexico had presidential elections. The political paramount was odd, after a term with a new political party after 50 years of the same Mexicans face the question of choosing the same one again,going back to the things they knew or chose a change once again. The results showed a divided country, since the elected president had won elections by just half of a porcentual point. It was technically a tie.
And the sore looser was not going to take it laying down. Oh and he didn't!!
Mexico city became a chaos when Mr. Andres M. Lopez decided he would take the city under siege until his rightful claims were heard (they never were) and he paralyzed one of the most busy and beautiful parts of the city with his siege, the economy of the whole city was affected, jobs were lost, businesses had to close since there were not enough for them to go on, traffic was a mayhem and yet he stood his ground for 47 days.
According to the National Chamber or Commerce at least 35 thousand businesses had to close, and a total of 7 thousand 796 million pesos were lost, since most businesses saw a steep reduction of 60% on their revenue and at least 3 900 000 people lost their jobs. Disaster!
And yet 2018 came along and Mr. Lopez had the great idea of ruining again!!
A lot of Mexican were worried, what if he lost again? Could the city endure another tantrum?
I wasn't that his ideals and proposals weren't good, it was just the fact that he had put his desires and what he believed were his rights above everything else, above other people's needs. How could you trust a leader that  doe that?
Luckily for our economy (fiuff) he won! and as stated before, his ideas and projects are good. Let's just hope he does fulfill his promises of bringing Mexico to what he has been calling The Fourth transformation.

This might be just teh first drafft. let me hear your ideas!!

Offline Billy Brexit

Re: The Mexican election
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2018, 09:17:43 AM »
The 2006 Mexican presidential elections was unusual. Following a term with a new political party after 50 years of the same policies, Mexicans face the choice of choosing the same party again, returning to the old system. or voting for a further change. The results showed a divided country, and since the elected president had won elections by just half of a porcentage point, it was technically a tie.
And the sore loser was not going to take this lying down. Oh, and he didn't!!
Mexico city became chaotic when Mr. Andres M. Lopez decided he would take the city by siege until his rightful claims were heard (they never were), and he paralyzed one of the busiest and beautiful parts of the city with his siege. The economy of the whole city was affected, and jobs were lost. Businesses had to close since there were not enough ( resources ? ) for them to go on. Traffic became complete mayhem, but Mr. Lopez he stood his ground for 47 days.
According to the National Chamber or Commerce at least 35 thousand businesses had to close, and a total of 7 thousand 796 million pesos were lost, since most businesses saw a steep reduction of 60% in their revenue. At least 3,900,000 people lost their jobs. It was as disaster!
When the 2018 re-election came along - Mr. Lopez had the great idea of running ( was ruining a deliberate choce of word? ) again!!
Many Mexicans were worried, what if he lost again? Could the city endure another tantrum?
I wasn't that his ideals and proposals weren't good, it was just the fact that he had put his desires and what he believed were his rights above everything else, even above the needs of the population. How could you trust a leader that  does that?
Luckily for our economy (fiuff ?), he won, and, as stated before, his ideas and projects are good. Let us hope that he does fulfill his promises to take Mexico to what he has been calling The Fourth transformation.

I'm in a political mood at the moment, so my suggestions may have been coloured by Brexit reports. Let me know if you think the changes are suitable, or if theu need to have a more local flavour.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2018, 09:19:41 AM by Billy Brexit »

Online Helana

Re: The Mexican election
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2018, 07:46:06 AM »
I didn't know, to be honest, all the chaos Andres manuel did provoque the last elections. Neither heard about the fear this ones, even when I was in Mexico at the time. But the thread is so welll explained that now I understand fully some of the preoccupations raising while Andres manuel was running for president.
All I can add is that, in Mexico, this year elections were lived by the people as something huge. The voting participation increased a lot and the results seems legit. On the other hand, there's a lot needing to be made in a country with such levels of poverty and violence, and  the  6 years Andres manuel is going to be in the power are not enough for changing more than 30 years of the same old government. Whatever happens, different times are coming to Mexicans and maybe it's time for them to ask themselves what are they doing wrong to perpetuate the violence, the corruption and the impunity, for there is no magical salvation standing in the presidency, but a human being trying -hopefully- his best.   
No president can change years of years of the same mindset in the people. No president can change the fact that the people is used and play their part in both the violent and the corrupted Mexican way of life. No meanwhile they still have they motto "el que no tranza no avanza" -meaning maybe "If you don't scam you can't progress in life"- as one of the most popular between the "common people".
« Last Edit: October 14, 2018, 07:49:31 AM by Helana »

Offline Sweetstar78

Re: The Mexican election
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2018, 09:47:44 PM »
The 2006 Mexican presidential elections were unusual. Following a term with a new political party after 50 years of the same policies, Mexicans face the choice of choosing the same party again, returning to the old system, or voting for a further change. The results showed a divided country, and since the elected president had won elections by just half of a percentage point, it was technically a tie.
And the sore loser was not going to take this lying down. Oh, and he didn't!!
Mexico City became chaotic when Mr. Andres M. Lopez decided he would take the city by siege until his rightful claims were heard (they never were), and he paralyzed one of the busiest and most beautiful and touristic parts of the city with his siege. The economy of the whole city was affected and jobs were lost. Businesses had to close since there was not enough money for them to go on. Traffic became a complete mayhem, but Mr. Lopez stood his ground for 47 days.
According to the National Chamber of Commerce at least 35 thousand businesses had to close, and a total of 7 thousand 796 million pesos were lost, since most businesses saw a steep reduction of 60% in their revenue. At least 3,900,000 people lost their jobs. It was as disaster!
But Mr. Lopez was never heard and the Federal Electoral Institute didnít budge, it would not order a recount of the votes. Mr. Lopezí claims were not related to the unfairness of the election policies in Mexico, they were claims based on how the polls were counted and how there were irregularities i this regard. The whole country felt cheated as did Mr. Andres. Mexico would be the only country in the world that would not hold a second round election when such claims were made and up to some point proven, or that wouldnít heed claims of unfair counting in an open election, the fact is that in Mexico you can win if you have as much as one vote more than your opponents.
The presidential term was bitter for many and the economy suffered due to the consequence of the city siege, many foreign investors were afraid and withdrew their money, others would note even dare to invest in Mexicoís economy and the feeling that the president was in its position only because someone cheated his way into it was wide and saddening.
Six years went by and election time was here again. Everyone said things would be different, the old party made promises again and now they had the Golden boy on their ranks, their candidate was charming, handsome and Young, he had a beautiful wife who used to be an actress in very famous Mexican soap operas, and thus with such publicity trick he won the heart of most Mexican women, women would say, Iíd vote for him just to have a handsome president to look at.
Andres Manuel was again in the run to become president, but the uncertainty was what if he lost again? Could the city endure another tantrum?
It wasn't that his ideals and proposals weren't good; it was just the fact that he had put his desires and what he believed were his rights above everything else, even above the needs of the population, citizens he had promised to help. How could you trust a leader that does that?
And so the people went back to the safest bet, the former party that had ruled for more than 50 years won again with the Golden boy. Andres Manuel was again out of sorts. This time though the winner had won 38.2% of the vote while Lopez Obrador had only obtained 31.56% of the total votes. He would have to wait yet another term to attempt and win the presidential chair.
2018 came around and some thought Andres Manuel have had enough fight, and he would not contend again, and yet they were wrong, he would give it his best and with amazing proposals and strong declarations against those in the highest levels of the government, envisioning a country that would take care of the least favored and that would be built on the shoulders of those who wanted to help him achieve this goal. Promising a stern government where those in high places would reduce their salaries, where there would be no excesses, he calls all this policies the way to pave the road to The Fourth Transformation.
This time, he won the elections, and he will become Mexicoís president in just a few weeks. Letís see if he indeed delivers these promises and fights for the citizens as he did for himself when he felt he had been wronged.     


Here is the second draft, I kept some of the correctins you suggested, let's see what you think of this!

Online Talk Merit

Re: The Mexican election
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2018, 05:13:12 PM »
Really sorry I haven't replied to this. I've been caught up in quite a few other issues. I'll go through it tomorrow.

Offline English

Re: The Mexican election
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2018, 10:56:42 AM »
There are a few minor points, such as a typo where you have left out the "n" in what I suspect is "in". Another one is the phrase " a complete mayhem", In this case mayhem is not being used as a noun, so the "a" is not required.

I think it is good, and you should submit it in the Bitcoin Talk forum - Politics may be the best board.

Don't forget to add a comment at the end linking your post to this project. Something such as " sponsored by the Fit to Talk English project" might be suitable.

Offline Sweetstar78

Re: The Mexican election
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2018, 04:50:28 PM »
There are a few minor points, such as a typo where you have left out the "n" in what I suspect is "in". Another one is the phrase " a complete mayhem", In this case mayhem is not being used as a noun, so the "a" is not required.

Thank your for your corrections, this point though, I wanted to use mayhem as a noun, now I'm not sure if this would be wrong. I don't think it is as the dictionary says this:

mayhem
noun [ U ] UK ​  /ˈmeɪ.hem/ US ​  /ˈmeɪ.hem/

a situation in which there is little or no order or control:

With 20 kids running around and only two adults to supervise, it was complete mayhem. 
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/es/diccionario/ingles/mayhem

Offline English

Re: The Mexican election
« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2018, 06:54:18 AM »
I posted  that too quickly, sorry. What I should have said was that the definite and indefinite articles are used with the singular noun. Examples are -
I joined the mayhem when I entered the kindergarten.
The room was in a state of complete mayhem.

Your use of mayhem is more general, so you would say "traffic became complete mayhem".

I check the phrase which included the "a" by using grammarly and a number of other sites. Each of them failed to flag it as an error. I asked about 6 English people, and all of them stated that the "a" should not be included. This illustrates the dangers of using on-line checkers.

Online Talk Merit

Re: The Mexican election
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2018, 08:15:34 AM »
Have you posted this in Bitcoin Talk.

I'll give you some merit if you add it to the political board with a fit to talk mention at the end.

Offline Fedora

Re: The Mexican election
« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2018, 05:44:56 AM »
I think in four years we will see many disappointed people for voting for him. He will not keep the promises he made, but he will carry out other things that will leave the average person calm and hopeful. It will be this, offer and give something, what will keep him in power.

It will be very complicated years for the country.

Online Helana

Re: The Mexican election
« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2018, 11:07:03 AM »
Absolutely agree. Despite the 6 years they have ahead, this is really difficult to combat and modify all the corruption and the rotten mindset of the people in the power. That's sad, but even if they are really willing to do some changes (which honestly I don't believe), this is going to be an impossible mission.
But... how knows?? Maybe this change into the political system is just bringing some hope to the people. And that, at the end of the day, is something powerful.