Author Topic: Unusual English words.  (Read 82 times)

Online Jet Cash

Unusual English words.
« on: January 17, 2019, 07:33:45 AM »
English is a particularly rich language, and most people only use a subset of the full vocabulary. I thought it would be fun to list a few of the more unusual words that I know. The first one is veridical.

veridical is derived from the Latin word "veridicus" which is a blendword of "verus" and "dicere", and that translated into "true to say". The more common alternatives are "truthful" and "veracious".

Offline Helana

Re: Unusual English words.
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2019, 08:30:19 PM »
In Spanish, we use "verídico", a very similar one.
I don't know why, but "gubbins"  is a word that has always sound weird to me!!!! Really, what do you guys try to achieve with this word?? What's its meaning? :P

Online Jet Cash

Re: Unusual English words.
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2019, 05:54:19 PM »
I think it comes from the old French, and it is a colloquialism for miscellaneous pieces.

Online Jet Cash

aa - yes it really is a word
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2019, 09:11:22 AM »
"aa" is the first word in the Oxford English Dictionary, It is a type of volcanic lava, and it is typified by light aerated rocks with jagged edges,

Online Jet Cash

leporine
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2019, 09:10:42 AM »
leporine

One of my posts in the Jet Cash coffee lounge thread in Bitcoin Talk reminded me of this word. It means " rabbit like" or pertaining to rabbits or hares. It is derived from the Latin word lepus, which actually means hare. Presumably the Romans didn't have many rabbits.