Author Topic: Some misuses of English words  (Read 711 times)

Offline Talk Merit

Some misuses of English words
« on: May 01, 2018, 01:55:25 PM »
The Internet has caused a massive explosion in the use of English and derived variations. I thought I would post a few misuses that are becoming commonplace now.

'None' is singular, so 'None of them are members' is incorrect, and you should say ' None of them is a member'

'Burglary' refers to the illegal entry into a building during the hours of darkness with the intent to commit theft, but it seems that now the darkness restriction no longer applies.

'amount' refers to the quantity of something that cannot be counted conveniently, such as the amount of corn in a silo. 'number' is used for items that can be quantified, such as the number of people waiting to join the forum.

I'll add a few more later, or perhaps you know of a few that we can discuss.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2018, 01:57:06 PM by Talk Merit »

Offline Fedora

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2018, 06:45:40 PM »
I understand. Thank you! :)

Offline yazher

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2018, 06:39:30 AM »
What is the Plural of "None" JC? and What if i use it in a sentence, how does it look like?

Offline Talk Merit

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2018, 09:31:52 AM »
Let us turn 'none' into an arithmetic equation to consider the plurality. - 5 x 0 = 0

Popular misuse of 'none' in a London colloquialism - ' I ain't got none'. This is supposed to mean 'I don't have any', but the double negative turns it into a positive statement,and it implies that you do have some.

An example of the use of 'none' - None of the bad posters on the Bitcoin Talk forum is being awarded merits.


Offline iillaa

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2018, 12:12:17 PM »
how much ?  how  many ?
how to separate the use of each one of them from the other ? (  can you rephrase my question ) 

Offline Talk Merit

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2018, 02:55:49 PM »
'how much' can be a question of price. For example - How much is a Lamborghini Huracan performante?
It may also be a question of volume. For example - How much corn can I get into that sack?

'how many' is a question of quantity. For example - How many sheep are there in that field.

Offline iillaa

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2018, 11:29:12 PM »
practice :

how many cars you own ? and for how much you bought each one of them ? and how often you use them in your daily life ? how many of friends you pick with you when you use your lambo ? how much the gas cost ?

how much volume  btc gain every day ?  how many btc you have ? how about investing in alt coins ? 


perfect  thanks i got it  ;D

Offline gawer33

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2018, 06:46:42 PM »
practice:
 what is the amount of water you put on the pot?

none of my teammates is interested in crypto


a burglar came to my house this morning

Offline Jet Cash

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2018, 07:26:06 PM »
@gawer

Your posts look pretty good, but there are a couple of minor points.

You put the water in the pot, and the pot on the fire.

The teammates one is fine, although some may put a space between team and mates.

The burglar one is interesting. Strictly speaking a burglar is a person who enters a domestic residence during the hours of darkness. However, modern usage seems to have removed the darkness restriction. I wouldn't say a burglar came to my house, as he might have been a confidence trickster, I would say ' a burglar broke into my house', but, once again, modern usage includes a person who climbs in through an open window with intent to steal.

Offline jackg

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2018, 03:56:45 PM »
'how much' can be a question of price. For example - How much is a Lamborghini Huracan performante?
It may also be a question of volume. For example - How much corn can I get into that sack?

'how many' is a question of quantity. For example - How many sheep are there in that field.

To give a bit more on this.
How Many - is used to ask a value of what someone wants when the unit is specified.
E.G How many litres of water do you want?
How much - is used to ask a value where the units aren't definied (either because they want the person to specify the units or because there can't be any applied).
How much is this drink worth? (the units could be in pounds or pence/dollars or cents)
How much water do you want? (as the person replying would have to specify the measure, litres, millilitres)...
« Last Edit: May 19, 2018, 03:59:28 PM by jackg »

Offline iillaa

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2018, 05:29:52 PM »
jet cash  i think i have a problem in using  the tenses 

we say :

did you understood what i mean ?   

did you understand what i mean ?

did you understand what i meant ?

did you understood what i meant ?


in present its easy  (  do you understand what i mean ?  )  also  is it correct if we use   do you understand what i meant ?  and  when we should use this form 


thank you :)

Offline Talk Merit

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #11 on: May 22, 2018, 07:46:00 AM »
did you understood what i mean ?   - this is incorrect

did you understand what i mean ?  - This is better, but 'I mean' is in the present tense, so it should be ' do you understand what I mean'

did you understand what i meant ?  -  This is fine except for the first person singular pronoun.

did you understood what i meant ?  - Close but you should use ' understand' - ' Did you understand what I meant?'

The first person singular is one of the anomalies in written English, and it should always be capitalised, this is regardless of its position in a sentence. The plural ' we ' is only capitalised when it is the first word in  sentence.

"Do you understand what i meant ?" would be used in a discussion with a person, and you are referring to an instruction or comment tht you made on a previous occasion.

« Last Edit: May 22, 2018, 07:47:34 AM by Talk Merit »

Offline iillaa

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #12 on: May 22, 2018, 12:04:34 PM »
lol  so  it  seem to be that  almost  all of them are correct   ;D .

just  found another interesting form    .  * Have you understood? *

Offline Talk Merit

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #13 on: May 22, 2018, 12:30:42 PM »
I like  the more direct - " Which part of NO didn't you understand?" :)

Offline iillaa

Re: Some misuses of English words
« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2018, 12:45:43 PM »
yes that may work  as well  . 

so  i just realized  that  i never use the  * s *  in the last of the verb with the  she / he / it pronoun   and now am a bit confused  .

we  need to use the *s*  when using the 3rd pronoun with every verb ?   like  she eats an apple  , or  there are some cases where we dont add the *s*

also  the *s* is a mark of plural when using verbs  like  we/they eats an apple  ? ( or  am just confusing lot of stuff  ;D